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Why Eating This “Demon” Food May Not Be So Bad (And What May Be Even Better)

Why Eating This “Demon” Food May Not Be So Bad (And What May Be Even Better)

So is eating saturated fat and cholesterol good or bad for you?

Used to be the old guidelines and doctor advice was to steer clear away like it was the plague…

More research however has thrown the old advice on its rear end…

The whole debate starts with saturated fats in meat, coconuts and diary…

… and its effects (or no effects) on triglycerides – a type of fat in your blood… 1

In one study people who ate coconut oil and exercised actually slashed their triglyceride levels… 2

So…

Why Should You Care?

Because those "blood" fats or triglycerides can clog your arteries leading to heart disease… IF they become a very small and clump together…

It may also be linked to inflammation which is best said as build up in the wrong places of your body which causes damage and swelling of sorts…

It’s also a strong indicator of how much blood sugar you have and how much is being turned into fat by too much insulin… especially if you’re a diabetic… which is why heart disease and diabetes often go hand in hand…

And furthermore…

A Brazilian rat study found that coconut oil and exercise could also lower blood pressure… which also related back to the idea of blood "pipe" clogging…

Great…

Where Does This Idea About Fat = Heart Disease Come From?

It comes from the "diet-heart hypothesis"… that low density lipoproteins (LDL) cholesterol skyrockets in the blood by eating saturated fat… which then leads to clogged arteries (as I said before) 3

… And eventually it leads to heart disease… 4

Does this make any sense for sure?

Not completely…

In a massive review of low carb diets, researchers found that most of the triglycerides or blood fat was coming from… (drum roll) carbs!

80% of carbs were being converted into blood fats or triglycerides in the body – it wasn’t all fats! 5

The theory that saturated fat causes heart disease has been around since 1955 when Ansel Keys introduced his lipid hypothesis… 6

Keys had the ear of a lot of people in high places, allowing his ideas about fat to be the pillar of today’s diet guidelines… even though his theories were never proven… even today! 7

And because of that we’ve been asked by our government health people to not eat foods like meat, dairy and coconuts…

We’ve become so brainwashed by it that scientists and health people who know better can’t even get the government or people to change… 8

The Flip Side

Now there is a flip side to this…

Recent Harvard research has shown that eating saturated fats however may lead to increased risk of death 9 and heart disease 10

Which flies in the face of other studies that have shown otherwise…

This is why the talk around saturated fat and cholesterol in food is so messed up…

The one thing you can be sure about… if you eat more "easy-to-digest" and/or highly processed, man-processed carbs your triglycerides or blood fats will go up way faster than if you ate saturated fats…

In fact the Harvard studies found that people who ate no fat and ate only carbs actually increased their chance of dying11

Even more than those people who ate saturated fat and cholesterol

Moving on…

The One Type Of Fat You MUST Eat for a Long Life…

The one point I do agree with the Harvard guys on:

Eating more unsaturated fats like monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats from plants is good for you… 12

No doubt about it…

The only thing I don’t recommend is using vegetable oils which is a processed fat that is stripped of whole nutrients…

From my book/course How to Treat Type 2 Diabetes Fast or Diabetes Mastery Blueprint:

Eating straight up oil is probably not going to be good for you and some research has shown that can actually be bad for your heart health13… and that’s the same as saying it triggers body searing inflammation too…

And using oil instead of whole food fats could also mean you start packing on the pounds and gaining weight (or your waist just gets wider)… Chalk it down to increased triglyceride blood fats and inflammation… 14

If possible get your fats from whole foods like nuts, seeds, avocadoes… you name it…

I certainly try my best to do so and so should you 🙂

Rise from the ashes,

Sunny


  1. Mayo Clinic Staff, "Triglycerides: Why do they matter? – Mayo Clinic," Mayo Clinic, Wednesday, December 14, 2016. Accessed Wednesday, December 14, 2016, http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/high-blood-cholesterol/in-depth/triglycerides/art-20048186.

  2. Net Doctor, "Coconut oil ‘can lower blood pressure’," Net Doctor, Wednesday, Feb 9, 2015. Accessed Wednesday, December 14, 2016, http://www.netdoctor.co.uk/healthy-living/news/a25466/coconut-oil-can-lower-blood-pressure/.
    Alves, Naiane FB, et al. "Coconut oil supplementation and physical exercise improves baroreflex sensitivity and oxidative stress in hypertensive rats." Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism 40.4 (2015): 393-400.
    Ryan, Jenny. "Coconut oil supplementation and physical exercise improves baroreflex sensitivity and oxidative stress in hypertensive rats."

  3. NHS, "Atherosclerosis – NHS Choices," NHS, Wednesday, December 14, 2016. Accessed Wednesday, December 14, 2016, http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Atherosclerosis/Pages/Introduction.aspx.

  4. Jo Adetunji, "Are saturated fats as bad as we have been led to believe?," The Conversation, Mar 5, 2014. Accessed Wednesday, December 14, 2016, https://theconversation.com/are-saturated-fats-as-bad-as-we-have-been-led-to-believe-24044.

  5. Paoli, A., et al. "Beyond weight loss: a review of the therapeutic uses of very-low-carbohydrate (ketogenic) diets." European journal of clinical nutrition 67.8 (2013): 789-796.

  6. DiNicolantonio, James J. "The cardiometabolic consequences of replacing saturated fats with carbohydrates or Ω-6 polyunsaturated fats: Do the dietary guidelines have it wrong?." Open heart 1.1 (2014): e000032.

  7. Hite, Adele H., et al. "In the face of contradictory evidence: report of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans Committee." Nutrition 26.10 (2010): 915-924.

  8. Grant Schofield, "Saturated fat debate shows how hard it is to challenge the establishment," The Conversation, Mar 6, 2014. Accessed Wednesday, December 14, 2016, https://theconversation.com/saturated-fat-debate-shows-how-hard-it-is-to-challenge-the-establishment-24056.

  9. "Specific Dietary Fats in Relation to Total and Cause-Specific Mortality," Dong D. Wang, Yanping Li, Stephanie E. Chiuve, Meir J. Stampfer, JoAnn E. Manson, Eric B. Rimm, Walter C. Willett, and Frank B. Hu, JAMA Internal Medicine, online July 5, 2016, doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.2417

  10. "Intakes of Individual Saturated Fatty Acids and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease in Two Large Prospective Cohort Studies of U.S. Men and Women," Geng Zong, Yanping Li, Anne J. Wanders, Marjan Alssema, Peter L. Zock, Walter C. Willett, Frank B. Hu, and Qi Sun, BMJ, online November 23, 2016, doi: 10.1136/bmj.i5796

  11. "Specific Dietary Fats in Relation to Total and Cause-Specific Mortality," Dong D. Wang, Yanping Li, Stephanie E. Chiuve, Meir J. Stampfer, JoAnn E. Manson, Eric B. Rimm, Walter C. Willett, and Frank B. Hu, JAMA Internal Medicine, online July 5, 2016, doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.2417

  12. "Specific Dietary Fats in Relation to Total and Cause-Specific Mortality," Dong D. Wang, Yanping Li, Stephanie E. Chiuve, Meir J. Stampfer, JoAnn E. Manson, Eric B. Rimm, Walter C. Willett, and Frank B. Hu, JAMA Internal Medicine, online July 5, 2016, doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.2417

  13. Sari, Ibrahim, et al. "Effect of pistachio diet on lipid parameters, endothelial function, inflammation, and oxidative status: a prospective study." Nutrition 26.4 (2010): 399-404.

  14. Bes-Rastrollo, Maira, et al. "Prospective study of nut consumption, long-term weight change, and obesity risk in women." The American journal of clinical nutrition 89.6 (2009): 1913-1919.

    Alper, C. M., and R. D. Mattes. "Effects of chronic peanut consumption on energy balance and hedonics." International journal of obesity and related metabolic disorders: journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity 26.8 (2002): 1129-1137.

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